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The Three Sisters - Corn, Beans and Squash

Are you ready for a corn-ucopia of knowledge?

Whether you celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day or Columbus Day, the transition to fall foods has us thinking about the Three Sisters. Who are these sisters you ask? According to Iroquois legend, corn, beans, and squash are three inseparable sisters who can only grow and thrive together. Read on to learn more about why!

This tradition of interplanting corn, beans and squash in the same mounds, is a sustainable growing system that provided long-term soil fertility and a nutritious diet for an entire community. Corn, beans and squash were among the first important crops domesticated by ancient Mesoamerican societies. Corn was the primary crop, providing more calories or energy per acre than any other. According to Three Sisters legends, corn must grow in community with other crops rather than on its own – it needs the beneficial company of its sisters. So the next time you take a look at any of these delicious veggies - remember to look out for the other sisters!


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Veggie of the month: Corn

Ready for a corn-ucopia of knowledge? Sweet summer corn is truly something special. It's the kind of corn that's lined with row upon row of plump, firm kernels in varying shades of yellow and white that explode with sweet, fresh flavor the moment you take a bite.

Corn (scientific name Zea mays), called maize in Spanish, has been a staple ingredient in South, Central and North America for thousands of years. First domesticated over 8,000 years ago, corn has been a traditional food for Native Americans and is eaten in the diets of people living all over the world, including many populations in India, Mexico, Italy and nearly every nation in Central America.

Did you know...?

  • Corn is grown throughout the warm summer months on stalks of “ears”
  • Corn can be found in different varieties, including red, pink, black, blue, multicolored and pruple (like our Organic Biodynamic Purple Corn Flakes).
  • The possibilities are endless! Corn is used around the world to make polenta, flour, fritters, soups, sauces and even eaten raw. 
  • The nutritional value of corn has helped support growing populations, especially living in impoverished areas, for many years. 
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